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Year - 2023Volume - 1Issue - 2Pages - 147-154

DIFFERENT METHODS OF PAIN MANAGEMENT IN AYURVEDA- A REVIEW

 25 Dec 2023  151

About Author

Kamdi D1,
1 1. PG Scholar, Department of Agadtantra and Vidhivaidyak , BMAM, Nandanwan, Nagpur

Correspondence Address

43, Vishwakarma Nagar, Galli No. 3, Velekar Nagar, Nagpur

Contact No. : 7620825530, Email : pranjalikamdi@gmail.com

Date of Acceptance : 27 Dec 2023

Date of Publication : 31 Dec 2023

Article ID : SD-IJAY_051

How to cite this article : http://doi.org/10.55552/SDNJAY.2023.1216

Abstract

Any suffering or discomfort, whether physical or mental, brought on by an illness or injury is referred to as pain. No matter how minor the pain is, it still causes agony and interferes with daily activities for the sufferer. A toothache can cause throbbing pain, a sports injury can provide muscular pain similar to a sprain, renal calculi can cause colicky pain that comes in spasms, stomach pain can cause joint pain owing to an inflammatory condition, and many other forms of pain can manifest. Musculoskeletal and neuromuscular pain, such as that caused by arthritis, sciatica, lumber spondylosis, headaches, etc., are highly prevalent in today's world. Acute and chronic pain are further classifications of pain based on how long it lasts. In the modern world Our go-to remedy for pain is a painkiller, but using them too frequently weakens our tolerance to the drug's negative effects and increases the risk of major long-term health issues. According to Ayurveda, pain arises from a vitiated Vata dosha, and when this dosha is effectively treated, pain naturally disappears. Many people have the misconception that Ayurveda is ineffective at treating acute pain and that its medications should only be used for chronic pain, with consistently delayed results. However, what these people fail to realise is how well Ayurveda is managed.

Introduction

One of the main symptoms of many illnesses is pain, which also happens to be the most frequent cause of medical consultations. Acute or chronic pain can strike at any age or stage of life and occur at any location with extreme intensity. It disrupts daily routines, impairs overall functioning, and occasionally has an impact on mental health issues. In addition to impairing physical functioning, pain also affects mental flexibility, working memory, attention control, problem solving, and information processing speed. Chronic pain can also have a negative impact on mental health, leading to higher levels of anxiety or depression. Pain may be psychological or somatogenic. Each person need a treatment of this kind, which has optimum benefit with minimum adverse effects. By this metric, Ayurvedic treatments and medications appear to be more successful with less negative effects on the body.

Discussion

Conclusion

Agnikarma is a procedure that is often recommended for problems that are mostly Vata and Kapha. It is a very successful pain treatment procedure that blocks the pain pathways. By eliminating the agents that cause pain and the vitiated doshas, bloodletting also reduces pain. However, a variety of compounds found in leech saliva reduce pain by obstructing the receptors that cause it. Swedana and Snehana pacify Vata, which is primarily responsible for pain. Basti functions at the Vata mool sthana, eliminating vitiated Vata from the body and providing relief from the suffering caused by the ailment. Sthanic Basti combines the benefits of Snehan and Swedana to calm Vata and relieve pain locally in the knee, neck, head, and lumbocaccral region, among other places. It has been discovered that Shirodhara therapy is a secure and efficient way to treat headaches. Ayurveda prescribes a variety of individual medications and combinations to treat various types of both acute and chronic pain. The aforementioned steps quickly produce miraculous effects.

References

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